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Face in the Palm: Athletics 5, Tigers 2

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While riding the People Mover back to my car in Greektown this afternoon, thinking about Sean Gallagher giving up six walks yet not allowing a run because the Detroit Tigers couldn't get a hit against him in four innings, one word and image kept coming to mind. But I didn't want to outright rip off our good friend Big Al (though I'm sure I will or already have at some point), so I went for something just slightly different.

I spent a large part of the game looking at the Comerica Park scoreboard, convinced there had to be some sort of mistake. Surely, the fine folks in charge of the scoreboard and in-game entertainment fell asleep at the console. Is this happening? Are we doing this now? (And by "we," I mean, "Do I really have to write about this when I get home?")

Gallagher also struck out six Tigers batters, by the way.

This thing was over before most of the matinee crowd had settled into their seats. Third batter of the game, Ryan Sweeney: Home run to deep right field. Next batter, Jack Cust: Home run to the opposite field, over Marcus Thames' outstretched glove. (I seem to have that effect on Armando Galarraga.) If you were watching on TV, you could've turned off the TV after that. And maybe you did. If you were at the ballpark, you could've got up and left. I strongly considered it. But it was a really nice day, and I had just sat down.

The result was never really in question, though the Tigers did mount a brief threat when they loaded the bases with three straight singles. (Once they broke the ice with one hit, they were almost on a roll.) But then Thames hit a line drive right to Jeff Baisley at third base, who then doubled off Mike Hessman at first. Rally chance over. Game essentially over.

Yeah, it's been that kind of season in Detroit. One in which the Tigers lose a series at home to an A's team that is in total rebuild mode. (The "A" in A's might as well stand for "Anonymous.") Tap me on the shoulder when it's okay to take my face out of my palm.